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transition from none to offer in the world religions she she has written about imperturbable foundation. >> joining us now in london is author karen armstrong, 20 plus books that she has written and well known in the united states. what do you write about? >> i read about all religion. and it's something i never thought that i do. because my dream had become to be a university professor in english literature. and even though i have been a nun when i was young, i moved away from that experience and wanted nothing to do with religion ever again and then a series of disasters occurred one after the other. and i found myself much to my surprise on television presenting some programs, some controversial programs that i was quite angry about religion. that career folded and i went off and wrote the history of god. it was four years that i was living on baked beans and tomato sandwiches with virtually no money. but it was a very formative period of time. but the experience of researching a book completely changed my outlook on religion. >> in what way? the mat for one thing, i was alone. on my
religions, established christian religion and gay and whether or not that is acceptable transferred if you look at american christianity today you find a reaction across the entire spectrum. defined open hostility. you find great silent discomfort. you find embrace. it would depends on where you look. the thing about all of this is about, most of these people are trying their best to do what they think is right. i think the motive does matter when looking at the. most people are trying to be loving, even if it doesn't always feel like love or look like love to some of the rest of us. >> host: can you give an example? >> guest: , so, the hardest exam for people to accept would be westboro baptist church which is the god hates church in kansas the when i went there i very much wanted to dislike the church. they are so angry. seems like they are so hateful. and yet they tried to explain to me that what they're doing is out of love because they believe that they've been instructed to love thy neighbor, and how can you love your neighbor more than tell them that they're going to hell if they ha
that part of social conservati m conservatism. it goes to what your boss's religion -- may not want you as an employee to -- what if your boss has an objection to cancer treatment or a vaccination for polio. in the 1970s in greenwich, connecticut a whole bunch of kids got polio, in the 1970s because they were from families who were christian science and didn't believe in vaccinations. their -- course of action as their son died and who sent a practitioner to the boy's bedside to pray while he died instead of giving him the insulin shot that would have saved his life. dozens of its members have been charged in connection with people's death from treatalable illnesses. deaths from measles, deaths from as ma, deaths from treatable tumors and can sir. if your boss is a christian scientist, should his legitimately held religious beliefs mean that your health insurance shouldn't cover things that he thinks should only be cured with prayer, things like measles, asthma, should he be able to if your boss is a joe hoef have's witness, should he be able to stop your health insurance from covering
of the obamacare. a federal appeals court ruled it violates the company's rite to free exercise religion. to what extent should people have the same rights. >> i'm joined by david ganz. he is in our washington d.c. studio. luke is the deputy general council, which represented parties which represented parties in the affordable care act. he joins us. great to have you with us. i want to start with you. the concept of corporate personhood or corporation has been long-established in american law. if a corporation is a person, why shouldn't the person have some religious rights. corporations have rights but the free exercise of reliageons is not one of them. at its core it's about conscience, conviction and human dignity. they are attributes that don't apply to a corporation. they can't pray. conscience. >> the supreme court allowed them under citizens united to express themselves under the first amendment by contributing to campaigns. >> it doesn't recognise that corporations have interest in human dignity. we have to look carefully at the right that's at issue in this case. corporations have never
of someone else's practice of their religion. >> when you say bear the costs, explain further how you mean? >> sure, the greens want to be excused from complying with certain provisions of the affordable care act primarily the provision of certain contraceptives without cost sharing. if they're permitted to do that their employees will have to pay for those out of their pocket. so that's a real out of pocket cost to female employees, and to female beneficiaries who are covered under their plan. >> david, hasn't the obama administration been wrestling with how to match employer demands, the law, and what the affordable care act requires thought the life of this law? >> it's been a contested policy, this particular one, and it has not had support even among some of the administration's applies who really didn't see the need for this contraception mandate to go forward in this way. the real struggle, the interesting thing, the real struggle and debate and controversy had been over how religious specifically religious groups and institutions would be either exempt from this mandate or accommod
of someone else's practice of their religion. of their religion. >> when you say bear the costs, >> when you say bear the costs, explain further how you mean? explain further how you mean? >> sure, the greens want to be >> sure, the greens want to be excused from complying with excused from complying with certain provisions of the certain provisions of the affordable care act primarily affordable care act primarily the provision of certain the provision of certain contraceptives without cost contraceptives without cost sharing. sharing. if they're permitted to do that if they're permitted to do that their employees will have to pay their employees will have to pay for those out of their pocket. for those out of their pocket. so that's a real out of pocket so that's a real out of pocket cost to female employees, and to cost to female employees, and to female beneficiaries who are female beneficiaries who are covered under their plan. covered under their plan. >> david, hasn't the obama >> david, hasn't the obama administration been wrestling administration been wrestling with how to match emp
his dalliance with religion and embrace of science and the secular world. this program is about one hour. >> okay, richard, i can't help but notice and admire your time, which has penguins on it. is there a significance to that? >> yes, it was hand-painted by my wife, and this is nothing like it in the world. she can campaign so might thais and we went to antarctica for a cruise, so this was my christmas present. so we were sitting millions of penguins. this was a wonderful gift. >> i love the way that they look so clumsy on the land like clumsy little humans. in the naked underwater and they are phenomenally fast for me wouldn't believe how quickly they can swim through the water and the streamlining is just beautiful. so like elephants, they are astonishingly fast and they jump out of the water and then they come back in again. >> your first successful book made you a rather controversial figure. but also along with christopher hitchens, you really made the word atheist acceptable and i think before that, people were ashamed to say that they were an atheist or they were embarrasse
in theology. second, religion is a subject at schools in germany, and muslims have long resented the fact that catholics and muslims could take their subject of religion at schools, but there were not lessons provided for muslims in schools. >> what about this mandate of the departments to help with the integration of muslims? >> this is a very difficult question. i think for the program to maintain integrity and respect among muslims in germany, it must be seen to be not an instrument of integration. if it were simply an instrument of the government to try to check perhaps extreme views among muslims, then it would be likely to be resented by many. i think that is a real danger. >> that perception is certainly a big question. another 1 -- there is a very serious problem right now within the islamic community here in germany about which islam should be taught and by whom. >> that's right. we are seeing that at the moment in the controversy about the professor who is resented by salafists who think that he is far too liberal for them. i don't think this is really a religious christian at a
these kinds of decisions, basically you're entering into anarchy. i could join in a religion that says paying taxes is not within our religion. >> you could sign me up for that one. >> they would say it's not our religion to pay taxes. sorry. that would break down. the politics is just rich because you have the democrats saying this was about women's rights and women's preventive medicine and you have republicans on the other hand saying we're standing with people who feel their religious rights are being violated. >> the the primary case is hobby lobby. the family behind it said they found it on biblical principles. they don't want to live one way on sunday, but go to work on monday abandon all the things they believe in. finding a balance here is what the justices have to decide. >> it turns on a question of whether a corporation is a person. that became the big thing in the campaign last year where mitt romney said you're taxing a corporation, you're taxing people. he was condemned by that. this is going to turn on same kinds of issues that were in citizens united, which is a court case th
to launch a thousand superpacs but what about the free exercise of religion? who when do the rights of an institution go so far in trampling the rights of individual women they disadvantage them because they're women? should a corporation like hobby lobby be able to refuse coverage for employees because of his own religious views? should the views of a small group outweigh the medical needs of thousands of workers or 82% of americans who support access to birth control? with me now, sally kohn and samuel ruis. sally, one thing about this -- >> only one? >> one of -- is this idea of, you know, hear this conversation about, you know, the institutions, the institutions. but what about the individual? i mean, particularly on the right, they love to talk about the constitution but part of the whole idea was there's a balance there. we protect individual rights, not just the institutions. i feel like there was a king or something that was, you know, trying to trample people's rights. >> i was confused on this one, too. we care about the individual when for instance we don't want, you know
of religion which is something we support. i think the more information you get the more you find out there are -- [inaudible] myths out there about the aclu -- my book is about people not only terrorists not only about them but us. now peter was asking before about the impact of some of these surveillance provisions and so forth. i was talking about how it gives us less privacy under the fourth amendment. it's not just the fourth amendment. it's also, you know, you talk about freedom of religion. that's about the first amendment. and my concern is that we're losing a lot of first amendment rights in term of freedom of speech, association, and of religion. so the freedom of religion if the government went after muslim charities right after 9/11. there were a lot of charities shut don -- down or doing badly. even though there was no evidence doing anything wrong. this that harms the first amendment. a study publish a week ago -- they did a survey of their members, the journalists and writers members of it. and what they found was that one in six of the people they surveyed said they ce
that world today. one of these forces is nationalism, and the other is religion. more precisely, the book is about how the emerging nationalisms of western europe acted upon the sensibilities of human beings and still act upon those sensibilities and about how the experience of personal faith and practice partly informed by these emerging nationalisms brought about new religious insights as well as permanent fractures within the unity of western christianity. today i'd like to focus briefly on nationalism and then spend the rest of our time together talking about the force of religion. but i won't talk directory about the book "heretics and heroes." that's for you to read later. i've noticed that many author talks are basically advertisements for their book, and i'd like to give you something more, a sort of analog experience. during the height of the cold war, i heard a joke from an old italian priest -- a joke that still has some truth in it. nato exercises were many progress over western -- were in progress over western europe to train new paratroopers from different nations. and the g
is that they accept others people's cultures and their religion and their traditions. i have accepted their way of wearing dresses, the way of speaking, their way of having communication. and that's what we need in our countries and in our society, is the acceptance of each others' traditions, each others' religion, age of this culture. so i think that is very necessity. >> speaking of religion, one person wanted to know how you feel about your religion and how people use it as an excuse for conflict and violence. >> it's a very good question, because whenever -- it's really sad to say that whenever a muslim person as a crime or do a bomb blast, i needed you can hear this, muslim terrorist. but when a person is not muslim when he does it, only a terrorist. an example is oklahoma, because nobody mentioned the religion the now people are saying muslim terrorist. so the thing is that islam is a religion of peace, is a religion of humanity, is a religion of brotherhood. the taliban only know about jihad and about fighting, they haven't heard of carron yet. they haven't studied it yet. [applause] >>
question, do the same companies have a freedom of religion. the lower courts are split on this. the tenth circuit court of appeals said yes, it ruled in favor of a company called hobby lobby, owned by a religious family in oklahoma. they say providing con tra septemberive care would violate their religious freedom because it would constitute abortion. other courts of appeals have said no and said the individual family members ruling in the case of one of the supreme court took it, a woodworking company in pennsylvania owned by a family of men nights. the supreme court said the individuals can't claim who own the company can't tell their religious freedoms are violated because it's the corporation that has to pay the cost of the health care benefits not the individual. the supreme court will look at both questions, do for profit corporations have the right to claim that a law would violate their freedom, it's something the supreme court never looked at before. can the individuals who own the company make that claim? they'll look at both issues. >> the other question i heard you talk about
corporations exercise religion. an appeals court in washington recently agreed ruling that the aca's contraception rule would force religious companies to, quote, become complicit in a grave moral wrong. now it's certainly true that corporations do have protections under the law. groups like hobby hobby want more, an employer's religious preference to trump their employees' freedom to make their own religious or health careticians. as marcy hamilton suggests, weigh are at a scary moment in our history if they say there is a constitutional right to shape benefits based on the religious beliefs of the owners. why isn't it discrimination against women based on gender and religion? joining me today daily beast correspondent, columnist ali cohn, and distinguished senior fellow bob herbert. that you all for being here. and joining us now from washington is nbc news justice correspondent pete williams who has been tracking this supreme court case here. pete, put this in context for us. there was what they call a circuit split, different rulings in the lower courts. how does that affect ou
care policies. some people say it violates freedom of religion. >> gordon, here is the background on this one. there are scores of lawsuits that are against providing plan b or the morning after pill through their employers. the country is split on the issue. that is why the supreme court will hear yet another obamacare challenge. obamacare's fate will once again rest in the hands of the land's highest court. up for debate -- oh should a private for-profit company be forced to provide such benefits ownersraception if their believe it is against their religion? a today, the president during fund-raising swing through california said he will gladly continue his fight. >> i am willing to fix problems there are, but i'm not going to abandon people to make sure they have health insurance in this country. of companiesdozens fighting is. foremost among them is hobby lobby. john boehner said -- the supreme court sided with the administration on the individual mandate. one month ago, voters said they were more likely to vote for democrats in the midterm election. in the wake of the trouble
is celebrated and the religion of redemption is carried on. ♪ ♪ ♪ [speaking in latin] >> as we offer our fruits and our praise to god, we pray to god for john fitzgerald kennedy, a servant of god, that he may be given everlasting rest. ♪ ♪ in a moment, the cardinal will invite all to join in prayer to the angels. the ♪ ♪ [speaking in latin] ♪ [speaking in latin] ♪ ♪ ♪ [speaking in latin] ♪ ♪ >> this begins the central prayer of thanksgiving. through which christ renews his work of redemption ♪ ♪ ♪. ♪ ♪ ♪ [speaking in latin] ♪ >> the first part of the prayer asks god the father to accept their souls and praise for the whole church. >> he is including in those special ways those are actually present. the ♪ ♪ [speaking in latin] ♪ ♪ ♪ [praying in latin] ♪ ♪ >> spreading his hands over the offering as he prays. we therefore beg you to accept, oh, lord, this offering. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> ease using the words of christ used at the last supper. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> this is my body, he is now blessing the words of christ himself. for this is the chalice of my blood
at the supreme court. this time the question is about religion and whether this new health care law can require companies to offer contraceptives. our justice correspondent pete williams joins us from our washington bureau tonight with this latest challenge to the law. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening. the supreme court has already ruled that corporations have free speech rights. now it has agreed to take up a big question it has never answered before. do private companies also have freedom of religion? the oklahoma family that owns the hobby lobby with more than 550 arts and crafts stores nationwide employing 13,000 people says the company is founded on religious principles. >> we believe wholeheartedly that it is by god's grace and provision that hobby lobby has been successful. therefore, we seek to honor him in all that we do. >> reporter: but the company says providing insurance coverage for contraceptive measures like the morning-after pill is the equivalent of paying for abortion, violating its religious freedom. a similar claim comes from a pennsylvania woodworking c
's requirement to cover contraception is a blow to their religion history. here's jim avila. >> reporter: hobby lobby plays christian music in its stores and sells some religious oriented gifts but mostly it's an arts and crafts shop. it's a business model that promotes a christian life-style and full birth control coverage mandated by obama care does not. >> we do everything we possibly can to be help to our employees of how they can structure their life based on biblical principles. >> reporter: the owners don't want to provide health insurance that pays for post exception birth control for its 25,000 employees, telling the supreme court, the so called contraception mandate violates their religion. >> my convictions enter into how we run our business. >> reporter: the first amendment guarantees individuals the right to practice their religion as they wish. now the supreme court will decide if for profit corporations have that same right. >> this would be the first time that the supreme court has ever recognized that corporations are protected in their religion liberty in the same way that liv
conducting research in theology. secondly religion is the subject of schools in germany and to muslims have long resented the fact that catholics because of kirkuk take that subject religion in schools but there was that one of the lessons provided for most runs in circles. what is mandated that the poppins to help with the integration of muslims and islam into german society. well i think this is a very difficult question i think for the program to maintain integrity and respect among muslims in germany it's that must be seen to be not an instrument of integration. if it was simply an instrument of the government to try to take care of. perhaps extreme views among muslims then it would be likely to be resented by many. i think it is a real danger in that perception is simply the question another one is theirs is very serious problems right now was in the islamic youth community here in germany about which islam should be on standby know that strike and was seen at the moment in a controversy about to possess a court shot at swansea university when he's resent it by its outfits using the ki
, the question i was asked most was not about abortion or religion or anything else. the question i get asked most was my views on guns. nobody can really say, how are you going to rule in this case, how are you going to rule in that case. instead they would ask me questions that were designed to figure out who i was and what i was. a lot of people, democrats, republicans, both, they would sit me down in the chair and say, did you ever hunt? i would say to myself, that is not really what we did growing up in york city. [laughter] they would say, did you have friends who hunt? have you ever shot a gun? have you ever held a gun? all of my answers to these questions were in their view, pathetic. [laughter] i was talking to one of the senators from idaho and he goes through these questions. he says to me, this is really important to me. it is important to my constituents. it is important that you understand how important the gun culture is in my state. there is a lot of fear about the way you might think about second amendment issues. you may not be familiar with this set of things. i appreciated
. but there was no religion on the face of it and ideology is obviously religion was like heroin and ideology was like methadone. [laughter] it brings you tumbling down but not a bit of its 100 million for communism and fascism. he's not seen for centuries because of ideology. >> it isn't always so clear. at its most violent phases there's not a huge distinction between religion and ideology because it was also the religious cult in which people could be tortured to death for trading on a speaker with his image on it and that his religion at its worst. it has nothing to do. it is a cult. if you think the group overemphasizes and is determinative of young people's behavior throughout their life, the great study of that is policed reserve battalion 101 where it's established the killing falls that went off behind. they kill women and children and then no one ever got punished for speaking chancellor. they were not sent they would be transferred and all that you might have in the meantime is a bit of jostling and anyone being punished for requesting the chancellor. yet they would kill women and children
annexation in 1888 americanizing importing our favorite religion capitalism and our second favorite religion, christianity. in certain ways, the americanization of hawaii in the 19th century parallels the americanization of america. just as the pier at ten forebears had set off on their arrogance into the wilderness of living lent, the new england missionaries of sale for the islanders in a place they thought of as a spiritual wilderness. just as perhaps nine out of ten needed so th since the america e wiped out by contact with european diseases fell with the native hawaiian population ravaged by smallpox, measles, whooping cough and venereal disease. just as the industrial revolution and building of the railroad brought in the huddled masses of immigrants to the united states, the sugar in patients founded by the sons of the missionaries required massive inputs of labor, primarily from china, japan, korea, portugal and the philippines transforming hawaii into what it has become, a multiethnic into which every race is a minority. hence the plate lunch. two scoops of japanese styled rice and
shall make no law establishing a religion. the states can have established churches. the founders set up a formula for dealing with a country that was different with different cultural and religious beliefs. the formula was limited government and individual rights. it has mostly worked pretty well. we have had some problems like a civil war. host: let's talk about the politics right now. two different paths in congress. the senate is taking up a conference of bill and the republicans looking at a piecemeal approach. it is highly unlikely that anything will happen before the end of the year. what needs to be done? >> it is not clear that they are going to reach a resolution. boehner says he will not go to congress on a conference of bill. some of the democrats who are a majority in the senate are saying we want to have a package , it has to be part of a package deal. i find myself critical of the positions of supporters of the senate bill and of the opposition to it. we have a big push in the senate bill for legalization. we have the opposition very concerned about border security. i thin
' war. but it wasn't a war of religion on the face of it. and ideology, you know, looking back because, obviously, the sense was that ideology finish religion was like hair win, and ideology was like methadone. [laughter] you know, it brings you trembling down from religion. but not a bit of it, 100 million dead prefer communism, naziism, fascism. barbarities not seen for centuries because of ideology. >> well, and also the borderline between ideology and religion is not always so clear. in its most violent phases, ask much of it was very violent, there's not a huge distinction, maoism, because it was also a religious cult in which people could be tortured to death for -- [inaudible] on a newspaper with mao's image on it. and that's religion at its worst really. it's not ideology, it has nothing to do with marxism, it's a cult. >> and the it's the pier group, isn't it? i mean, you know, considered -- i mean, one of the, if you think the peer group is emphasized as a determinant of young people's behavior and, in fact, throughout their lives, the great study of that is christopher brown
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
to tijuana and released. no lawyer in that process. every religion that i'm familiar with teaches that things like that are not the right way to go and we do have public officials who are happy to mention their own religion and i get a kick out of it and check their voting record because on this issue and on your issue, they are part of the problem. who are they? they are your friends. they are the people you like. they like environmental things, other things. these things i tried to talk to them and so have others much more powerful than i am. he was in mexico for 3 months. he had a mental breakdown. he thought he was dead. to check if he was dead he stepped out in front of a trick and the truck missed him. and his mother went day in and day out to check the bodies in tijuana and finally he wondered back and finally the lawyers at a c l u, made a case t . the government was unrepent ant. the best way to do is go to the place and look at the people and be a voice coming out as best you can and say this is what i saw and on the 5th floor, some of them well-dressed people i mentioned in my sta
provision violates freedom of religion. supreme court justices decided to review provisions of the affordable care act that require employers to provide health insurance that includes birth control. an appeal, brought by evangelical christians who own hobby lobby, an oklahoma city, based nationwide chain of craft stores who's founder and ceo said in sebelius versus hobby lobby "business owners should not have to choose between violating their faith and violating the law." ---a position supported with hobby lobby videos on youtube and the company's website. "we have never been ashamed of being a christian company...we have been blessed." a key argument in this freedom of religion case, hinges on the supreme court's 2010 citizens united ruling which essentially counts corporations with rights as individuals. but in chicago, toni johnson, a single mother, laid off in august from her job as a mortgage broker, said health care reform has provided her and her son with monthly coverage for 300-dollars less than she paid before. "i'm only paying $100 a month and i get to keep my doc
administration, not religious institutions.. if you arere a secularist, you think that religion is what happens on sundays and the rest of the week religion does not exist, but the argument of these institutions is that our areolic soup kitchens embodidiments of our faith, and thus, ought to be exempt as well. those cases are likely to succcceed in the supreme court. aut a for-profit corporation is aicier one because of that issue e of, is e corporation itself e entitled to first amendment rights? >> about on obamacare, accordind o'keefe, senate democrats, the political messing operation is urging senators use the brake to publicize good news about obamacare. mewhile, senate republicans are urging their folks to push website, talkingg about the gripes and shortcomings of obamacare. it is the battle of the anecdote. >> that is the political overlay for this whole thing. whether this is a struggle -- when you get down to it, crystallize the issue obamacare -- between those that want to do something good and decent for people, providing health care to 40 million people that do not have it, or tho
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
sides. >> yeah. religion is a fascinating one. i speak in my report, i think we have to realize the establishment clause is not to avoid religion, to appoint a specific religion, and it is an effective way to engage people. i think of someone who can to saudi arabia when i was there who was jewish and his father had recently died. in the jewish faith you read every days certain passages from the torah to honor your father. when he mentioned that to the saudis, they loved that. he was open about what he was doing religiously and they respected that. we have to be open about that. it is something that is important for them. there is much more religion in their daily debate than you might hand here. we cannot shy away from that, but rather embrace it as something that is worthwhile, and one thing -- explaining that the united states is religious. that is always surprising to audiences. a journalist in boston, said he had 10 churches within a few blocks in boston, and he never realized americans were so religious. i think that is something that is a barrier and breeds a lack of trus
the owners have religious affiliations, can they exercise freedom of religion in choosing whether to provide certain types of contraception to their employees. the lower courts are divided on this, and that's why both the government and the companies want the supreme court to decide on this. this is sort of an echo of -- do you remember mitt romney saying corporations are people, my friend? >> right, right, right. >> this is really the question here. do secular companies have individual rights like religious freedoms. >> emily, elahe, thank you so much. >> thank you. >>> congresswoman gwen moore is fired up over this. she says it's a woman's rights issue. her take on the new supreme court obama care case right after the break. charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. you can fil
christianity, i've always felt that judeo-christian religion is the wellspring of morality in this country, and as a society becomes more secular, freedom for jews to go away alongside freedom for christians. in california there's already a bill moving through the california assembly that would strip the nonprofit status from any group that discriminates on the basis of religion, sexual orientation or gender. so, i believe that when we discard religion and religious values including christian because this is largely a christian country by and we are shooting ourselves in the foot. what is the secon was the secone question? >> host: google, easter and people using bing. >> guest: but, again, i appreciate when folks use market power to make their point as opposed to calling for government censorship to cause google is a private company and they can do whatever they want but making a folks awar folks ar political stance is something that is worthwhile and allows us to make informed decisions the same way if there is a website that they don't like they make informed decisions on whether to use
to religion. what's the supreme court is going to decide. cuts to the heart of a key provision of the obama healthcare law. >> talk to us about the political impact. this is hardly the distraction that the obamacare administration wants to see at this point. people up in arms about their religious freedom as americans to express themselves and not be compelled to provide contraception, you know, emergency services, that type of thing that goes against their religious beliefs. >> that's right. the big context here is the focus at the white house over the course of the next few months and next year is to sell this healthcare law to make it seem like a winner. they are focused very much on getting the web site fixed. this is going to be a separate distraction. the idea of the supreme court arguments probably in the spring and finally a decision through the summer that gets to this issue of freedom of religion and people saying that they feel like their own religious beliefs are being violated as part of obamacare it's another distraction for a law that doesn't need anymore that comes from outs
religion, pope francis is tackling triple-down economics. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america, on this tuesday, november 26th, 2013. i'm david shuster in new york. here is a look at some of our top stories. another part of the obamacare is heading to the united states supreme court. the issue is birth control - where for-profit businesses can deny it on religious reasons. >> the vatican is calling for sweeping reforms - a more mercy. church with less centralized power. >>> two b 52s enter the china sea violating the chinese air defense zone. . >>> we want to update you on the weather - the dangerous storm racing up the east coast of the united states. thousands of flights have been cancelled and the worst is yet to come. you can see people are not moving quickly in some of these crowded airports. kevin corriveau has the latest. >> we are looking at the storm and it's covering the whole eastern sea board. a lot of rain in this and snow at the top in the northern part. look at new york. i want to take you back to harold square, on 34th street and sixth avenue. it is raining. wh
right of freedom of religion. hold on. when your freedom of religion as compared to the ability to obtain contraceptives. no one's saying they can't obtain contraceptives. the employer is saying i don't want to pay for them. >> jay, a lot of the terms of insurance are set by the government all the time. if you have a corporation where the -- >> no. >> -- where the employer, the owner, says, we don't want to have black people work there so we won't offer insurance to our black employees. that's something that's illegal. you're not challenging that. >> that's right. >> of course. because there's a compelling governmental interest to eradicate racial discrimination. there is not a compelling governmental interest to require in this particular case birth control or whatever it might be some may consider abortifacients. not a compelling government interest. >> not compelling for a woman to have the right to choose to have her rights. that's not a compelling interest in your view. >> sure. the women have -- see but i think it's conflating the issue that's before the court. the case is
at all ages and social classes, no matter what religion. so, we are not talking about a problem that is specific to one particular culture. now, of course, there are some traditions that are deeply harmful to women and men including the one i cited, the female genital mutilation. culture.nce is not a the international instruments which apply to all countries and to which most of the countries in the world have signed up provide for measures to recognize universal women's human rights. the endsbout access to and victims feeling free to be able to talk about violence? >> this is a huge problem. for sure this is a problem victims. in france, we have been working in countries like syria, libya, democratic republic of congo, where the very difficult step for victims is to be able to say what has happened to them. is because all too often the blame is placed on the victim rather than on the perpetrator. that really has to change. >> are you quite positive about change? optimistic. but there is a lot of work still to be done. it is difficult to believe in is still we are citing so horr
about love. love for me. i want to talk about politics and religion and domestic violence. makes me sick contemporary because it is relevant to the times now. that's what i want to talk about. tavis: how do you do that without being preachy? how do you make it sound good? very goodwith songwriters who get the point across, bending without breaking i don't want to be preachy. go back to some of my father's music, which is amazing. it is still relevant. it's amazing. he left me with a lot of music i can rest her back to. >> it impacted your life and your song stylings. why is it important to take that ? you could be singing lyrics that are totally different. why is it important to do it that way? universei put into the is so important to me. to say,eople to be able she really talked about what was happening, what was going on, and it was a history lesson. it has always been important to me. i love blues music so much. it. ithe potential of want it for the rest of the world. in order to do that, i have to evolve and grow so the music can evolve and grow. i had been singing for 15 years. to
is also coming against bad religion just as strongly as he is against any bad economic policy because he's saying a religion that closes us in on ourselves, that says i have what i need so i'm fine, i will just seek god in my private life and not recognizing duties to help the needy is a false religion. and he comes down harder on religion than economics. >> well, selflessness is something we should all aspire more to. father pavone, thank you so much for your time today. >> always good to see you. >> you, too. >>> we have been covering this morning and telling you about four people dead after a commuter train crash. that train actually derailed in new york. 63 others we're told are injured, some of them critically. dr. ernest paddy is at st. barnabas hospital in the bronx where many of the injured are being treated. >> thank you, shannon np. >> can you tell us about the injuries you're seeing? >> what i can tell you is st. barnabas hospital received 12 patients today from the accident. two of them are in critical condition. the other ten are stable. and, you know, the injuries that they
religion in america. based in austin texas wright has written six other books, the looming tower al qaeda and the road to 9/11 and won the pulitzer prize for general nonfiction in 2007. please join me in a miami welcome for lawrence wright and joe childs. [applause] >> well, good morning. larry, let's begin with a word in the title of the book. "going clear" scientology, hollywood and the prison of belief. scientology devotes a lot of organizational energies to tap into the celebrity culture that is so prominent in the united states today. talk to us about that. talk to us about what you found it while you devoted so much attention to that aspect of the book. >> scientology was really created as a religion that would use celebrities. it was established in los angeles in 1964 and there was a reason for that. l. ron hubbard the founder of scientology realized that americans really do worship one thing for sure and that is celebrity. where's the capital of celebrities? hollywood so scientology has become one of the major landlords and holiday -- scientology. there was a church publication pu
no law establishing a religion. the states can have established churches. the founders set up a formula for dealing with a country that was different with different cultural and religious beliefs. the formula was limited government and individual rights. it has mostly worked pretty well. we have had some problems like a civil war. host: let's talk about the politics right now. two different paths in congress. the senate is taking up a conference of bill and the republicans looking at a piecemeal approach. it is highly unlikely that anything will happen before the end of the year. what needs to be done? that they arelear going to reach a resolution. boehner says he will not go to congress on a conference of bill. some of the democrats who are a majority in the senate are saying we want to have a package , it has to be part of a package deal. i find myself critical of the positions of supporters of the senate bill and of the opposition to it. we have a big push in the senate bill for legalization. we have the opposition very concerned about border security. i think in this case as in othe
. it amounts to the majority of the religion, and all over the country and world rather there are atheists and jews and christians who are in jail. you don't believe that he should sit in prison? >> absolutely not. should it have been part of the deal? now the leverage is gone. there has been blasphemy among christians. this administration has been silent. they went crazy over a video. and christians are being raped and murdered and they said nothing. it does not weigh heavily on the president's heart. i don't think that he wants to in anyway embarrass islam. the president said in a boom that he wrote that he will always stand with islam. >> it is interesting because we don't know what the fate is going to be now and we have to hope and pray that somehow he is released. i have to move on with this. it was 100 years ago. it was packed with religious referen references. these bounties cannot penetrate and soften even the heart which is ha bit alley in sensible to the ever watchful providence of the almighty god i do therefore invite my follow mernses in every part of the united states to set
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